Game On! Sunday School Games to Help Keep Kids Engaged

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by Avery Foley on April 10, 2019
These games help kids use up some of their boundless energy in a constructive way that contributes to the fun they have in Sunday school, as well as learning their memory verses and the lesson.

Kids have energy—a lot of it. That’s why in our Answers Bible Curriculum we list Sunday School games and other activities in the prep chart for you to play with your class. These include our Come on In! game, memory verse time, and lesson review activities & games. These games help kids use up some of their boundless energy in a constructive way that contributes to the fun they have in Sunday school, as well as learning their memory verses and the lesson.

Now, we include more games than you can use in just one lesson and that’s intentional. As the old adage goes, “variety is the spice of life.” But don’t feel you have to play a different game every single week. Perhaps gather all the supplies for one game and play it for three or four weeks. Then pick a new one and play it for a few weeks. Before your students get tired of the game or find Sunday school too predictable, you’re changing up the game.

In addition to changing up the specific game, you can also mix up which type of game you are playing. For example, some weeks play a Come on In! game, other times you can have the children do puzzles before class and play a Scripture memory game instead. Keeping a variety in your games adds an element of fun and surprise to your class.

Lesson review games are the most important because they help cement what the class has just learned.

Lesson review games are the most important because they help cement what the class has just learned so if you only have time for one game, we encourage you to play a review game. As a note, Scripture memory games work best when students have already been working on their verse for a few weeks and are therefore fairly familiar with it.

We designed these games to be adaptable depending on your group size. If you have a large group, divide into two or more teams to ensure everyone gets a turn. If your class is small, you may need to be creative. For example, in a relay game, you may not be able to have teams compete. Instead, have the whole class as one team and time students to see who can get the best time. Alternatively, if your class is really small, the teacher can compete against the students.

Of course, these tips only work if you’re using Answers Bible Curriculum! If you’re not, visit AnswersBibleCurriculum.com to try a month of lessons for free.

© 2019 Answers in Genesis